QFD Training

QFD Training
QFD training describes Quality Function Deployment - product design 'gone right' transforming customer needs into profit maximized launch plans.
Price $299
Duration 1 day
Start Day Options
SUMOTUWETHFRSA
Legend:
unavailable
available
facility match

Fast Track

If you're flexible with travel, jump ahead by selecting one of the recommended facilities to the right. Otherwise, the form below helps drill down from state to city to a specific training facility for your QFD Training class.

Recommended States

Pre-enrollment is accepted until the minimum student requirement is met. Once enough students have signed up, then we will reach out to process your payment. If minimum enrollment is not attained, we may ask that you consider an alternate date or location. With that in mind, would any of the 4 states be possible for you? Facilities in these states either have a low minimum student requirement, or already have students signing up:

StateCountry
NevadaUnited States
CaliforniaUnited States
ArizonaUnited States
UtahUnited States


All States

However, if travel is a limitation for you and none of the states above will work, don't worry. We have several options. And if none of those below suit your needs, feel free to contact us and make a request. We will do everything possible to accomodate. A common request we receive is to do on-site training for companies seeking to get several employees trained at the same time.



About QFD Training


Who is QFD Training for?

Quality Function Deployment Training is for anybody hoping to maximize profitability resulting from the design of their service, process, or product. Sometimes, QFD is referred to as the "House of Quality" because its product planning matrices have the shape of a house. In our course, students learn:

QFD Training Course Overview:

Far too often, engineers gather among themselves, and pump out designs with zero input from actual customers. The worst example we've seen was $20M spent on developing a pressure-based uninterruptable power supply system that had no market interest. The engineers thought it was a great idea. And technically it was pretty nifty. Unfortunately, nobody wanted to buy it, and it was a complete waste of shareholder dollars. To avoid mistakes like this, our students learn a structured approach to capturing customer needs and translating them into specific plans to produce products to meet those needs.

Customer Needs. Capturing “voice of the customer” (VOC) through direct discussion or interviews, surveys, focus groups, customer specifications, observation, warranty data, field reports, etc.

Product Planning. Constructing a matrix to translate general customer “what’s” into more specific engineering “how’s” being product requirements or technical characteristics to satisfy the needs.

Part Deployment. Cascading assembly-level requirements down to the component level.

Process Planning. Evaluating candidate manufacturing processes and choosing processes to make each part.

Quality Control. Defining process control plans to assure retention of capability throughout each part's production.

States

Recommended

Below are our most popular 4 states.

Nevada
Nevada

California
California

Arizona
Arizona

Utah
Utah

Testimonials

Read what our students and clients have to say.

Charles Haymaker
Charles Haymaker
Vice President
International Transport


I had the privilege of working with our Master Black Belt when he spearheaded the Six Sigma transformation within our company. The "do-as-I-do" disciplined style of his direction resonated within our entire organization. This was during a period of escalated growth and the management struggles that often accompany. Through his steady and focused approach, he brought structure to the craziness, garnered buy-in at all levels, and was quickly recognized as the guru. This was several years ago and now as a leader in an unrelated industry, I still find myself looking back on many of the concepts and methods we discussed. You may remember that one great teacher you had when you were in school, or a mentor you still think about today? He is one of those kind of special people who one is fortunate to know.